Coming Events:

Derek Smith Interview - Video Premiere (Wed. 10/28 6pm)

Derek Smith, associate professor of literature at Claremont McKenna College and executive board member of the Center for Law and Justice, speaks with Paul Grondahl of the NY Writers Institute. 

The Time for Reckoning: Community Response - Live Conversation Premiere (Mon. 11/2 6pm)

An expanded panel made up of Albany community members and activists will have a follow-up online discussion in direct response to the statements made by the elected officials in the previous symposium. Be a part of the conversation by watching and sharing comments on the Facebook page of the All of Us social justice group.

Watch the Albany Symposium:

The Time for Reckoning: Confronting Systemic Racism, Seeking Justice and Reimagining Society - Video Premiered (Mon. 10/26 9pm)

The symposium strives to create an ongoing dialogue between community members of color who live in urban communities where tensions with police run high and elected officials whose job is to protect and serve the public.

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COMMUNITY VOICES

I AM A MAN

I Am A Man, a monologue written by Marcus Gardley, is a deeply heartbreaking invitation to imagine a visualization of the human being behind one of the countless hashtags we see all too often and how they would like to be honored. In this video, Julian Tushabe takes away the choice to imagine and uses his own voice and physical being to humanize the message further.

I Am A Man, a monologue written by Marcus Gardley, is a deeply heartbreaking invitation to imagine a visualization of the human being behind one of the countless hashtags we see all too often and how they would like to be honored. In this video, Julian Tushabe takes away the choice to imagine and uses his own voice and physical being to humanize the message further.

Black Theatre Troupe of Upstate NY

Website

Facebook

"I Need Transformation"

Shawn Young (co-founder of All of Us), Queen Simba Fox (founder of Community Matters) and Brielle Sophia (community and transgender activist) discuss why transformation of policing is needed, and methods for achieving lasting change.
 

Magpie

"I wrote this poem after seeing the video of Ahmaud Arbery gunned down while around the same time dealing with the stress of my mother recovering from Covid-19. It is deeply unconscionable that simple things like walking, jogging, sleeping, waiting, driving...among so many other ordinary daily life activities could be a Black person's last in the presence of police and racist vigilantes.  While it speaks to the presence of two pandemics, the one of systemic racism has been with us for far too long and what I want the reader to pull from this piece is the urgent necessity to speak out."

Nub of The Issue

By Black Theatre Troupe of Upstate NY

Written by Barbara Howard, "The Nub of the Issue" takes us back to September 1987, when Nixon-era Justice Department official Robert Bork was being considered as an appointee to the U.S. Supreme Court. In the scene, pioneering black politician Barbara Jordan goes toe-to-toe with Republican Senator Gordon Humphrey.

Community Microgrants

Thanks to the Steve McKee Foundation

A generous gift from the Steve McKee Foundation of Troy will provide for microgrants to be awarded to local activists, grass-roots community groups, artists, writers, filmmakers and people of all ages, especially students, who are actively engaged in collaborative efforts to address systemic racism and to create work and actions to overcome it. Proposals are being accepted now, through the end of October.

RESOURCES

Slavery By Another Name

By Douglas A. Blackmon and the Public Broadcasting System

Slavery by Another Name is a 90-minute documentary that challenges one of Americans’ most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation. The film tells how even as chattel slavery came to an end in the South in 1865, thousands of African Americans were pulled back into forced labor with shocking force and brutality. It was a system in which men, often guilty of no crime at all, were arrested, compelled to work without pay, repeatedly bought and sold, and coerced to do the bidding of masters. Tolerated by both the North and South, forced labor lasted well into the 20th century.

Public Broadcasting System

Studying Systemic Racism

Browse our routinely updated list of links to resources for learning more about systemic racism and how we can work together to destroy it.

The 1619 Project

View a collection of educational resources based on The NY Times far-reaching historical project re-examining the legacy of slavery in the US.

How to Dismantle White Supremacy

Read a powerful article written by local author, Barbara Smith in The Nation.

Ibram Kendi: The Difference between Being "Not Racist" and Antiracist

Ibram Kendi discusses antiracism in this informative TED Talk.

Ijeoma Oluo On Talking About Race And Racism

Ijeoma Oluo is the author of the New York Times bestseller, So You Want to Talk About Race (paperback 2019), a frank how-to manual for engaging in conversation about one of the most sensitive issues of our time.

American Forum Interviews

Interviews with Bryan Stevenson, Michael Eric Dyson, and others.

James Baldwin's Words

View a collection of videos where Baldwin shares his thoughts about race, culture and the fight for equality. His words are just as poignant and meaningful today.

How Jim Crow Shaped America

Jim Crow and the deep wounds it inflicted on American society are not relegated to the past tense. Learn about the growth, death and legacy of Jim Crow laws.

Barbara Smith: Ending White Supremacy

Barbara Smith, author and activist, discusses how to destroy the system of white supremacy in the US on this Democracy Now interview.

 
 

ABOUT

“The Time for Reckoning: Confronting Systemic Racism, Seeking Justice and Reimagining Society” premieres October 26th at 9:00pm on WMHT's NY Now.

 

"The Time for Reckoning" addresses systemic racism in the Capital Region’s justice systems, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder by a Minneapolis police officer.

 

Its overarching goal is to imagine a just society free of systemic racism, where Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) truly have no reason to fear that they or a loved one will lose their lives at the hands of police.

 

“The Time for Reckoning” achieves this by providing a multi-media, interactive and collaborative forum for the voices of local leaders and impacted community members, local elected and city officials, and nationally-known experts.

Symposium Activities

See, Learn, and Act against systemic racism in the Capital Region, by exploring media and participating in live online discussions developed in collaboration with symposium media partner WMHT.  View a month-long campaign of interactive activities that tackle the complex issue of systemic racism in policing.

Symposium Participants

Learn about the government officials and community members taking part in impactful 'Time for Reckoning' symposiums across the Capital Region. 

Symposium History

The Time for Reckoning symposium is part of a two-year-long project organized by the Center for Law and Justice (CFLJ) in response to the 2018 shooting of 19-year-old African-American Ellazar Williams by Albany Police Department Detective James Olsen. Learn details about the actions that the Center for Law and Justice  has taken and events from the Capital Region and around the US that have influenced this project since then. 

PARTNERS

 

CONTACT

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© 2020 by The Time for Reckoning Working Group